Should You Be Drinking Coffee Everyday?

Monday’s…

Back to ‘the grind’ of work, hustle & bustle, and getting as much done as sunlight allows. And what magical fuel do we widely use to get through the day?
 

COFFEE

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According to the National Coffee Association survey, 83% of American Adults consume 3 cups of coffee each day, totaling 587 million cups are consumed per day in the United States!
 
I love coffee, (I’m actually drinking mine while writing this!) but HOW and WHEN you consume caffeine plays a large role in how your body responds to it;
 
There is a HUGE difference between having “just a coffee”, or a “Fat-Free Caramel Quad Shot Latte, Upside Down, 3 Pumps of Caramel, Extra Caramel”. Those add-ins can contribute tons of unnecessary sugars and questionable ingredients.
 
If you can’t even get dressed properly before stumbling to the coffee maker in the morning, it might be time to address that. Many people use caffeine as their go-to tool for waking up but don’t always use it as a crutch to get you through the morning.
I get it, black coffee might seem disgusting to you. But I’m willing to bet a bunch of things you now enjoy used to be “gross”. And if you don’t feel that way, your mother definitely can vouge that Brussel sprouts, beer, dark chocolate, and broccoli were not part of your top foods list. The point I’m trying to get at here is if you are willing and open to trying something new, chances are it will be easier to adopt and enjoy it.
I wrote a previous article about coffee you can follow the link below to read more of:
I wrote that article a while back, and although it does have some great information in it, I must clear up some “facts” that I must highlight or adjust my viewpoint on…

 

“Your body’s cortisol levels reach their full potential between 12-1pm and about 5:30-6:30pm, so try to avoid having some around those times to prevent interference. A good way to allow your body to readjust is to drink your coffee about 20-30 minutes later on each morning.”

  • This remains one of the top takeaways from this post and wanted to highlight its importance. Cortisol identifies as a stress response hormone and plays a very important role in regulating blood sugar as well as its utilization for energy. Altering your natural cortisol production from caffeine can have an effect on how your body processes the other things you put into your body.

“By adding the elevated fat levels to your morning body routine, it can aid weight loss since your body is triggered to burn fat deposits rather than the carbohydrates you would eat. That process is called ketosis; a metabolic state occuring from a lack of carbs, causing our bodies to utilize fats as a fuel source.”

  • The above quote is referring to the “Bulletproof Coffee” recipe I listed. Bulletproof coffee consists of MCT Oil (derived from coconuts), Ghee/Butter, and Coffee. Upon learning more about ketogenesis, that state cannot be achieved just by drinking coffee with an added fat (MCT Oil, Butter, ect.). It takes a much larger shift in the nutritional intake to achieve a ketogenic state of energy usage, and will not just happen from drinking special morning coffee. HOWEVER, it can be used as a great way to prolong your morning meal or satiate the bodies hunger, since there are calories in the coffee (and thus, provides energy). The good fat consumption is important for optimal internal and physical health.

The link to my previous article can be followed here;

Coffee; When, Why, and How to Drink It

I highly recommend this read if you or anyone you love is an avid coffee drinker. Thanks for reading!

pourmoi-coffee-beans-coffee-cup-panelimage

 

 

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